Check my WP site for base64 code?

David Beroff

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Is there a way to scan my WordPress site for potentially malicious code? I read a few articles and they said that I need to check my WP site for base64 code but where and how then they didn't say in details. Can you guide me?
Your help would be appreciated.
 

mobin

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If you are a website owner, the common and useful security plugin for WP nowadays I am hearing is wordfence. That also has a feature that actively protecting your installation. But I don't have any previous experience with it and cannot recommend; please check user reviews and see if that is useful for you.

Another easy technique is to download your files locally, scan with an updated anti-virus , clean the reported code and upload back to the server. Finally, if you can get hold on your technical support team, check whether the server is loaded with scanner software, so that you can use it to scan.
 

Sean101

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As my experience, base64 code can in included in your Wordpress file and databases.
Download your files and databases to your PC and using a tool and starting search with base64 or eval. It is better if you can manually check your files and find any suspicious codes because hackers tend to encrypt their codes to protect from viewing.
 

VirtuBox

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VirtuBox
My opinion = no wordfence ...
Here some command to check your wordpress instance :

Code:
# If the hack was recent, check lastly modified files
$ find . -mtime 0

# Some hacks are nice enough to include a comment for when a block starts/ends  (ex: //istart)
$ find . -type f -name "*.php" | xargs grep -H "istart"

# Normally files with hacks use base64 encoded data in an attempt to hide code
$ find . -type f -name "*.php" | xargs grep -H "base64_decode"

# Eval-ing of code is usually a sign of something naughty (allthough lots of plugins etc use this)
$ find . -type f -name "*.php" | xargs grep -H "eval("

# Sometimes php files are "hidden" inside the javascript assets folder
$ find wp-includes/js -type f -name "*.php"
Source : https://gist.github.com/andersevenrud/63b567e3489aafde64a6
 
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