Wordpress InnoDB or MyISAM ?

DenisMNE

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Hello!

For Wordpress users, which one do you use as an engine for storage ?

InnoDB or MyISAM ?

Which one is better ?
 

KnownHost-DanielP

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Sadly InnoDB is the way to go. The big difference between them is that when performing certain actions InnoDB only locks a single row of a database table, where-as MyISAM locks the entire table during the operation. So your main advantage is table vs row locking which allows InnoDB to out perform MyISAM when it comes to write operations.

Now here's the tricky part, MyISAM is a LOT easier to repair/recover from where-as InnoDB is much more apt to suffer corruption as it uses a couple of methods to index changes / actions so a lot more moving parts to get out of sync.

Regardless I think InnoDB wins as long as managed properly as backups are very important!
 

DenisMNE

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DenisMNE
Well, that was nicely said.
Why is it that heard to repair InnoDB ?
Why do you think that ''sadly'' ,as you said, InnoDB is the way to go ?
 

KnownHost-DanielP

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KnownHost-DanielP
In our realm we see innodb corruption from a couple of cases. Specifically hard power failures / reboots (i.e. pull the power plug) or systems running out of memory/disk space.

What happens generally speaking is the InnoDB index gets out of sync with the actual data written in the database files and you have to go through recovery processes to get them back. Sometimes successful and often times always resulting in some type of data loss. The worst type of table to experience this are those used to write session values, as they are almost constantly being written to and have the highest chance of corruption. InnoDB has several 'force recovery' levels that let you try and extract the data and bypass some errors, warnings etc and I'd say they are 80-90% effective, but the larger your database the more difficult it is to recover.
 
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