Ping TTL

Paul Wellner Bou

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When I tried to ping a domain, the result is as

Code:
C:\Users\user>ping www.example.com

Pinging www.example.com [xxx.xx.xx.xxx] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from xxx.xx.xx.xxx: bytes=32 time=254ms TTL=49
Reply from xxx.xx.xx.xxx: bytes=32 time=263ms TTL=49
Reply from xxx.xx.xx.xxx: bytes=32 time=264ms TTL=49
Reply from xxx.xx.xx.xxx: bytes=32 time=251ms TTL=49

Ping statistics for xxx.xx.xx.xxx:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 251ms, Maximum = 264ms, Average = 258ms

C:\Users\user>
whats TTL mean in Ping?

How is a good TTL? it should be high or low?
 

energizedit

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TTL is time to live. Tells how long the packet has been in the router. Really with a ping test you just want this to be as low as possible, the lower the faster the response is from the server.
 

David Beroff

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David Beroff
Should I consider this when choosing a hosting server?
If I remember correctly this is response time of a web hosting?
 

Collabora

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Collabora
No. You have been given incorrect information. It is neither the time a packet sits in a router, nor does it measure response times

Ping uses TTL as a backwards counter. TTL decreases by 1 at every router in its path to a host. Thus, if a ping packet starts with a TTL of 255 (and it usually does) and passes through 10 routers on its way to its destination the reported TTL = 245. I think your example is one in which initial TTL is not 255, but 63 (for binary reasons). If so, in your example a TTL = 49 would mean there were 14 routers between you and the destination host (63-49).

The purpose of TTL is to make sure that packets that cannot reach a host die and disappear. If we did not have TTL, packets with no destination would quickly clog the network. Ping packets are set to the max TTL=255 since Ping is a test utility.

You can probably see now that ping TTL has nothing to do with your host.
 

LJSHost

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Not really, TTL problems can be based at your ISP, the hosting provider or anywhere in between.
 

hfav

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Ping and the tracert/traceroute utilities both use TTL value to attempt to reach or route to a the destination host.

The maximum TTL is 255, but it is not the default. The default value depends on the operating system.

Each router that receives the packet subtracts 1 from the TTL count, if the TTL count remains greater than 0, the router forwards the packet, otherwise it discards it and sends ICMP message back to the originating host, which may trigger a resend.

If the initial TTL value is 64 then after it has passed through the first router it drops to 63. The TTL you are seeing in your ping response is counting down from the default used by the OS on your gateway router.

The ICMP echo response is a new packet and will have a fresh TTL filled in, it will not count down from what was left in the TTL from the ICMP echo request.

Purpose of TTL is to stop packet from routing loop.
 
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